Hey, I'm Astrid...
22 Texas
Hey, I'm Astrid...
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"I wonder how many times you’ve compared me to her."
(Ten word story)
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nubbsgalore:

Photos by Gerry Ellis from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park. Here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. The elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.
When elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. Grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. But as Dame Daphne Sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”
Approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. With an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of Africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years. 
CBC’s The Nature of Things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. You can foster an elephant with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust online here. For more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts
nubbsgalore:

Photos by Gerry Ellis from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park. Here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. The elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.
When elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. Grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. But as Dame Daphne Sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”
Approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. With an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of Africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years. 
CBC’s The Nature of Things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. You can foster an elephant with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust online here. For more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts
nubbsgalore:

Photos by Gerry Ellis from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park. Here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. The elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.
When elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. Grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. But as Dame Daphne Sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”
Approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. With an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of Africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years. 
CBC’s The Nature of Things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. You can foster an elephant with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust online here. For more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts
nubbsgalore:

Photos by Gerry Ellis from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park. Here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. The elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.
When elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. Grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. But as Dame Daphne Sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”
Approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. With an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of Africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years. 
CBC’s The Nature of Things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. You can foster an elephant with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust online here. For more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts
nubbsgalore:

Photos by Gerry Ellis from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park. Here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. The elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.
When elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. Grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. But as Dame Daphne Sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”
Approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. With an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of Africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years. 
CBC’s The Nature of Things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. You can foster an elephant with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust online here. For more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts
nubbsgalore:

Photos by Gerry Ellis from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park. Here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. The elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.
When elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. Grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. But as Dame Daphne Sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”
Approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. With an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of Africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years. 
CBC’s The Nature of Things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. You can foster an elephant with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust online here. For more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts
nubbsgalore:

Photos by Gerry Ellis from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park. Here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. The elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.
When elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. Grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. But as Dame Daphne Sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”
Approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. With an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of Africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years. 
CBC’s The Nature of Things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. You can foster an elephant with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust online here. For more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts
nubbsgalore:

Photos by Gerry Ellis from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park. Here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. The elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.
When elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. Grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. But as Dame Daphne Sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”
Approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. With an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of Africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years. 
CBC’s The Nature of Things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. You can foster an elephant with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust online here. For more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts
nubbsgalore:

Photos by Gerry Ellis from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park. Here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. The elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.
When elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. Grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. But as Dame Daphne Sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”
Approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. With an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of Africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years. 
CBC’s The Nature of Things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. You can foster an elephant with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust online here. For more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts
nubbsgalore:

Photos by Gerry Ellis from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park. Here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. The elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.
When elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. Grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. But as Dame Daphne Sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”
Approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. With an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of Africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years. 
CBC’s The Nature of Things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. You can foster an elephant with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust online here. For more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts
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Most people give the homeless change or leftovers, Mark Bustos is cutting their hair

For the past few months, New York City hairstylist Mark Bustos — who normally spends his days working at an upscale salon — has been volunteering on his days off to offer haircuts to homeless people he sees on the street. With a simple phrase, “I want to do something nice for you today,” he has been helping people get a fresh, uplifting makeover.
For people who have been trapped in a cycle of poverty, unemployment and homelessness, the makeover can also serve a useful function: looking presentable for a job.
Inspiring thanks he received from one man | Follow micdotcom

Most people give the homeless change or leftovers, Mark Bustos is cutting their hair

For the past few months, New York City hairstylist Mark Bustos — who normally spends his days working at an upscale salon — has been volunteering on his days off to offer haircuts to homeless people he sees on the street. With a simple phrase, “I want to do something nice for you today,” he has been helping people get a fresh, uplifting makeover.
For people who have been trapped in a cycle of poverty, unemployment and homelessness, the makeover can also serve a useful function: looking presentable for a job.
Inspiring thanks he received from one man | Follow micdotcom

Most people give the homeless change or leftovers, Mark Bustos is cutting their hair

For the past few months, New York City hairstylist Mark Bustos — who normally spends his days working at an upscale salon — has been volunteering on his days off to offer haircuts to homeless people he sees on the street. With a simple phrase, “I want to do something nice for you today,” he has been helping people get a fresh, uplifting makeover.
For people who have been trapped in a cycle of poverty, unemployment and homelessness, the makeover can also serve a useful function: looking presentable for a job.
Inspiring thanks he received from one man | Follow micdotcom

Most people give the homeless change or leftovers, Mark Bustos is cutting their hair

For the past few months, New York City hairstylist Mark Bustos — who normally spends his days working at an upscale salon — has been volunteering on his days off to offer haircuts to homeless people he sees on the street. With a simple phrase, “I want to do something nice for you today,” he has been helping people get a fresh, uplifting makeover.
For people who have been trapped in a cycle of poverty, unemployment and homelessness, the makeover can also serve a useful function: looking presentable for a job.
Inspiring thanks he received from one man | Follow micdotcom

Most people give the homeless change or leftovers, Mark Bustos is cutting their hair

For the past few months, New York City hairstylist Mark Bustos — who normally spends his days working at an upscale salon — has been volunteering on his days off to offer haircuts to homeless people he sees on the street. With a simple phrase, “I want to do something nice for you today,” he has been helping people get a fresh, uplifting makeover.
For people who have been trapped in a cycle of poverty, unemployment and homelessness, the makeover can also serve a useful function: looking presentable for a job.
Inspiring thanks he received from one man | Follow micdotcom

Most people give the homeless change or leftovers, Mark Bustos is cutting their hair

For the past few months, New York City hairstylist Mark Bustos — who normally spends his days working at an upscale salon — has been volunteering on his days off to offer haircuts to homeless people he sees on the street. With a simple phrase, “I want to do something nice for you today,” he has been helping people get a fresh, uplifting makeover.
For people who have been trapped in a cycle of poverty, unemployment and homelessness, the makeover can also serve a useful function: looking presentable for a job.
Inspiring thanks he received from one man | Follow micdotcom
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zeroing:

Erin Hanson
zeroing:

Erin Hanson
zeroing:

Erin Hanson
zeroing:

Erin Hanson
zeroing:

Erin Hanson
zeroing:

Erin Hanson
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homebeccer:

flying-prussian-pugs:

rules-broken-fate-rewritten:

stickthinmodels:

feminspire:

YES!

IMPORTANT

the second one? i can buy that somewhat. the first one? breasts are sexual organs.

I SWEAR TO FUCK. NO. NO THEY ARE NOT. BREASTS ARE MEANT TO FEED BABIES. BREASTS ARE NOT MEANT FOR SEXUAL FUCKING PLEASURE. BREASTS SOLE EVOLUTIONARY PURPOSE ARE TO FEED THE YOUNG, NOT TO HUMOUR MEN IN BED.

#the literal sole purpose of a boob is wait for it#AN UDDER#IT IS LITERALLY A COW UDDER#AND PEOPLE TOUCH COW UDDERS TO GET MILK ALL THE TIME#IT AINT SEXUAL OR ELSE IT WOULD BE SEEN AS BEASTIALITY TO GET COW MILK#SO PLEASE#SHUT UP ABOUT IT BEIGN A SEXUAL ORGAN
jesse oh my god
homebeccer:

flying-prussian-pugs:

rules-broken-fate-rewritten:

stickthinmodels:

feminspire:

YES!

IMPORTANT

the second one? i can buy that somewhat. the first one? breasts are sexual organs.

I SWEAR TO FUCK. NO. NO THEY ARE NOT. BREASTS ARE MEANT TO FEED BABIES. BREASTS ARE NOT MEANT FOR SEXUAL FUCKING PLEASURE. BREASTS SOLE EVOLUTIONARY PURPOSE ARE TO FEED THE YOUNG, NOT TO HUMOUR MEN IN BED.

#the literal sole purpose of a boob is wait for it#AN UDDER#IT IS LITERALLY A COW UDDER#AND PEOPLE TOUCH COW UDDERS TO GET MILK ALL THE TIME#IT AINT SEXUAL OR ELSE IT WOULD BE SEEN AS BEASTIALITY TO GET COW MILK#SO PLEASE#SHUT UP ABOUT IT BEIGN A SEXUAL ORGAN
jesse oh my god
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"I just want somebody who will never stop choosing me."
A.G. (via nevahmind)
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blurrymelancholy:

Matilda (1996), dir. Danny DeVito
blurrymelancholy:

Matilda (1996), dir. Danny DeVito
blurrymelancholy:

Matilda (1996), dir. Danny DeVito
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"You are not designed for everyone to like you."
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"If I had a drink for every fuck I gave about you, I’d be intoxicated forever. I’d drink myself to death."
(via tr4pezeswinger)
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